M T W T F S S
        01 02 03
04 05 06 07 08 09 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 31
Add An Event

Neuroscience Brown Bag Series

Thursday, November 29, 2018,

Event Image
  • Location: Wilson Hall • 111 21St Ave S • Nashville, TN 37240
  • Room: 316

Steven P. Errington

Department of Psychology (Schall Lab)

Vanderbilt University

Amirsaman Sajad, PhD

Department of Psychology (Schall Lab)

Vanderbilt University

Jeffrey D. Schall, PhD

Department of Psychology 

Vanderbilt University

"Cortical microcircuitry of response monitoring in supplementary eye field"

The need for cognitive control is most prominent in response conflict, where there are multiple competing, yet incompatible, action plans. In these situations, improper and unsuitable responses must be inhibited to reduce the likelihood of an error occurring and maximize the probability of receiving the optimal and intended outcome. In the countermanding paradigm, we can consider performance outcome as a race between go and stop processes embodied by the gaze-shifting and gaze-holding circuits respectively. Here, response conflict is engendered on successfully canceled trials through the co-activation of mutually incompatible movement (go) and fixation (stop) units after the appearance of a stop-signal. To perform cognitive control, the brain must receive information about the environment, before performing the appropriate computations that assess the need for adjustment, before sending information to the relevant brain areas to action the required changes. These computations are typically thought to occur through a cortical microcircuit. Although a theoretical model of a conflict monitoring microcircuit has recently been proposed, direct experimental evidence for how conflict monitoring signals are orchestrated across the cortical layers in the medial frontal cortex is missing. In this talk, I will discuss our findings to date on the laminar profile of response monitoring in the supplementary eye field.